The Bayonne Nature Club is not authorized to rescue animals and birds.  We do not have licenses or permits that are required by law.  Please contact the following organizations in New Jersey if you have a bird or animal that you feel needs a rescue.  Be prepared to provide transportation to the location for rehabilitation.

Remember that every day animals eat other living animals for food.  This is Nature's way. Even innocent little birds will die.  When they die, they feed the insect world which helps turn their flesh and bones into soil, thus maintaining the environment of trees and plants so that other animals and birds can live. This is the natural cycle. Death comes, this truth we all must face.

Sometimes the animal that you hope to rescue is better left alone.  Usually there are adult birds willing to step in and feed the baby birds if only the big human would get out of the way.  If you find a baby bird, simply move it to a shrub or low tree and let nature do the rest.  Birds and animals may use your back yard for nesting or for shelter during stormy weather.  Do not assume that they need any further rescue than that of using your yard for a short stay. Wild animals are capable of taking care of themselves. 

HAZARD: Wild animals that are injured can be dangerous.  They become vicious because they are in pain. You may be risking your own safety by getting involved in a rescue.  If you still feel something should be done, contact one of the groups on this page. 
ANIMAL AND BIRD RESCUE PAGE:
Liberty Humane Society
http://www.libertyhumane.org
Jersey City NJ 
201-547-4147 x9

The Raptor Trust
http://www.theraptortrust.org
Millville, NJ
908-647-2353

Antler Ridge (Mamal Rehab)
http://www.antler-ridge.com
973-800-2420

Franklin Lakes Animal Hospital
http://www.franklinlakesanimalhospital.com/services/wildlife/
Franklin Lakes, NJ
201-848-1991

NJ Fish and Wildlife - Injured Birds and Animals
http://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/bornwild.htm




Bayonne Nature Club
Appreciating, protecting and improving urban nature sites.
If you have found a bird (dead or alive) with a tag on its wing or a number on a ring on its leg, you can report it to the Bird Banding Laboratory.  They will pass the info on to any other organization that has tagged birds.  They will also let you know where and when the bird was tagged. (You may have to wait a while before you get a response.) This information is helpful in the study of birds and where they travel to. 

REPORT BIRD TAG OR RING NUMBER:

Bird Banding Laboratory, Patuxent Wildlife Center.  
Click here to report  www.pwrc.usgs.gov